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Egg Donor Blood Type

Posted in Egg Donation on June 12, 2013 by Donor Concierge Staff

For most intended parent blood type should not be a deciding factor when choosing an egg donor. Blood type has no medical bearing on the outcome of the ivf cycle and it can limit your egg donor options considerably. However, for many international intended parents, particularly from Asia or the Middle East, blood type is a serious concern. It is important to know that children do not always inherit the exact same blood type as their parents. For those who it is important we can help find egg donors with specific blood types.

Each parent carries two "alleles" for both blood group and Rh factor, of which only one is passed on to ones offspring. To help our clients with this please see this chart and information provided by Dr. Sandy S. Chuan, of San Diego Fertility Center. Dr. Chuan works with many couples coming from China where blood type is important to the families in order to maintain their privacy.

Blood Type Information

It is important to remember that children do not always inherit the same exact blood type as their biological parents. For example, a couple with blood types of A and B could have an offspring with any of the four blood types: O,A,B, or AB.

Keep in mind that if you choose a donor without regard to blood type, you greatly increase your donor choices.

Blood type is inherited from both parents. Our blood type has 2 alleles-1 from Mom and 1 from Dad which determines what blood type we have. O is the recessive inherited allele and A and B are the dominant alleles. Therefore, you get an O from one parent and an A from the other you will be blood type A.

Examples:

  • If you are blood type A you can be: AA or AO
  • If you are B-you can have BB or BO
  • If you are AB- you have an A from one parent and a B from another
  • If you are O- you got O from both parents

The reason why parents who have A and B blood type can have a child with blood type O is because if the parents are AO or BO they have a 25% chance of having a child who will inherit both the O alleles from both parents.

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